ergo-log.com

Definition: "An ergogenic aid is any substance or phenomenon that enhances performance "

about us

/

contact

/

23.12.2013


Pseudo-ephedrine unreliable doping agent for cyclists

Pseudo-ephedrine, the active ingredient in many cold remedies, improves some cyclists' performance and has no effect on others. According to Kellie Pritchard-Pescheka, an Australian sports scientist at the University of Queensland, some athletes' bodies absorb this stimulant surprisingly slowly. Even if this is taken into account, it's still questionable whether pseudo-ephedrine actually works at all.


Pseudo-ephedrine, the active ingredient in many cold remedies, improves some cyclists' performance and has no effect on others. According to Kellie Pritchard-Pescheka, an Australian sports scientist at the University of Queensland, some athletes' bodies absorb this stimulant surprisingly slowly. Even if this is taken into account, it's still questionable whether pseudo-ephedrine actually works at all.
Pseudo-ephedrine, the active ingredient in many cold remedies, improves some cyclists' performance and has no effect on others. According to Kellie Pritchard-Pescheka, an Australian sports scientist at the University of Queensland, some athletes' bodies absorb this stimulant surprisingly slowly. Even if this is taken into account, it's still questionable whether pseudo-ephedrine actually works at all.

In 2010 Pritchard-Pescheka wrote in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism that trained cyclists were 5.1 percent faster on a time trial after taking 2-3 mg pseudo-ephedrine per kg bodyweight 60 minutes before starting. [Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2010 Apr;20(2):132-8.] But in a new study that the same researcher is about to publish in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, she concludes that pseudo-ephedrine does not improve cyclists' endurance performance.

In the most recent study 10 experienced cyclists, average age 25, did a time trial on three occasions. On one occasion they were given a placebo 60 minutes before starting, on the other two occasions they were given 2.3 mg or 2.8 mg pseudo-ephedrine per kg bodyweight. The figure below shows that the cyclists' average speed increased after they had taken the substance, which by the way is on the WADA doping list. The effect was not statistically significant, though.


Pseudo-ephedrine, the active ingredient in many cold remedies, improves some cyclists' performance and has no effect on others. According to Kellie Pritchard-Pescheka, an Australian sports scientist at the University of Queensland, some athletes' bodies absorb this stimulant surprisingly slowly. Even if this is taken into account, it's still questionable whether pseudo-ephedrine actually works at all.


The times of the individual cyclists are shown below. Clear as mud.


Pseudo-ephedrine, the active ingredient in many cold remedies, improves some cyclists' performance and has no effect on others. According to Kellie Pritchard-Pescheka, an Australian sports scientist at the University of Queensland, some athletes' bodies absorb this stimulant surprisingly slowly. Even if this is taken into account, it's still questionable whether pseudo-ephedrine actually works at all.


Pseudo-ephedrine, the active ingredient in many cold remedies, improves some cyclists' performance and has no effect on others. According to Kellie Pritchard-Pescheka, an Australian sports scientist at the University of Queensland, some athletes' bodies absorb this stimulant surprisingly slowly. Even if this is taken into account, it's still questionable whether pseudo-ephedrine actually works at all.


The researchers measured the amount of pseudo-ephedrine in the cyclists' blood before and after they did the timed ride. The speed with which the cyclists absorbed the substance varied considerably. The figure above shows the concentration of pseudo-ephedrine after taking the higher dose.

When they looked more carefully at their data, the researchers discovered that the cyclists whose pseudo-ephedrine peak coincided with the timed ride didn't automatically record better times.

"The considerable variation in plasma pseudoephedrine between individuals following ingestion was unexpected and may explain why some studies have shown improvements in performance while others have not", the researchers conclude. "Moreover, peak plasma pseudoephedrine concentrations following pseudoephedrine administration in the present study did not appear to coincide with time trial performance."

Source:
J Sci Med Sport. 2013 Aug 8. pii: S1440-2440(13)00180-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.07.015. [Epub ahead of print].

More:
Paracetamol improves sprint series performance 16.12.2013
Cyclists bike faster with paracetamol 17.03.2011
Cobalt chloride boosts stamina in animal study 10.12.2010