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07.06.2016


Low-inflammatory-index diet protects against cancer

French researchers are studying a diet that reduces the chance of developing cancer and may also extend life expectancy. The diet reduces the synthesis of inflammatory factors such as interleukin-1-beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha. The features of the diet? Large amounts of vitamins, tea, turmeric, good fatty acids, magnesium and selenium, herbs, peppers, fibre and garlic. And according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, this type of diet doesn't work if you drink too much alcohol.

Diet Inflammatory Index
Cancer cells grow and spread faster through the body the more inflammatory factors are present. These include interleukin 1-beta, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumour necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive protein. We know that nutritional factors have an influence on carcinogenic inflammatory factors.

So a diet that reduces the synthesis of inflammatory factors should in theory reduce the chance of cancer developing. And because aging is accompanied by a cascade of inflammatory reactions, a diet like this may also increase life expectancy. That's our surmise, which we simple compilers of this webzine pass on to you freely.

The more calories you consume daily, and the more carbohydrates, bad fats, proteins, cholesterol, vitamin B12 and iron you consume, the more inflammatory factors your body produces. Nutritional factors that reduce the synthesis of inflammatory factors include unsaturated fatty acids, fibre, magnesium, beta-carotene, vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B6, B11, C, D, E, anthocyanidins, flavan-3-ols, flavonols, flavanones, flavones, isoflavones, garlic, ginger, pepper, onions, tea, eugenol, saffron, selenium, turmeric, zinc, thyme, oregano and rosemary.

Study
The researchers followed 6542 adults for about twelve years, and recorded who developed cancer and who didn't. The researchers also knew the content of the participants' diets, and were able to calculate a Dietary Inflammatory Index for each person.

Results



At first it appeared that a diet with a high inflammatory index only offered protection against prostate cancer. The men whose diet had the highest inflammatory index [Quartile 4] developed prostate cancer twice as often as the men whose diet had the lowest inflammatory index. This was a statistically significant difference.


French researchers are studying a diet that reduces the chance of developing cancer and may also extend life expectancy. The diet reduces the synthesis of inflammatory factors such as interleukin-1-beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha. The features of the diet? Large amounts of vitamins, tea, turmeric, good fatty acids, magnesium and selenium, herbs, peppers, fibre and garlic. And according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, this type of diet doesn't work if you drink too much alcohol.



But when the researchers analysed their data, they discovered that alcohol also played a role in the protective effect of a low-inflammatory-index diet. That's not so surprising: alcohol exacerbates inflammatory processes. The positive effect of a diet with a low inflammatory index is negated when high levels of alcohol are consumed.

And hey presto: [Table] the table below shows that a diet with a low inflammatory index offered better protection against cancer in the group that consumed low amounts of alcohol. Low alcohol consumption means a daily maximum of 0.6 glass for women and a maximum of 2.4 glasses a day for men.


French researchers are studying a diet that reduces the chance of developing cancer and may also extend life expectancy. The diet reduces the synthesis of inflammatory factors such as interleukin-1-beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha. The features of the diet? Large amounts of vitamins, tea, turmeric, good fatty acids, magnesium and selenium, herbs, peppers, fibre and garlic. And according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, this type of diet doesn't work if you drink too much alcohol.



Among the women who drank little alcohol, a diet with a low inflammatory index reduced the chance of developing breast cancer by a factor of four.


French researchers are studying a diet that reduces the chance of developing cancer and may also extend life expectancy. The diet reduces the synthesis of inflammatory factors such as interleukin-1-beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha. The features of the diet? Large amounts of vitamins, tea, turmeric, good fatty acids, magnesium and selenium, herbs, peppers, fibre and garlic. And according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, this type of diet doesn't work if you drink too much alcohol.



Conclusion
"To our knowledge, this study was the first to investigate the prospective association between the overall pro- or anti-inflammatory potential of the diet, assessed with the Dietary Inflammatory Index, and overall, female breast, and prostate cancer risk", the researchers summarised.

"Consistent with mechanistic data, our results suggest that a proinflammatory diet may be associated with increased prostate cancer risk. When models were stratified by alcohol intake, a major cancer risk factor, a pro-inflammatory diet also was associated with increased overall and breast cancer risk in low-to-moderate drinkers."

"These results provide interesting insights for the understanding of the relations between diet and cancer risk, and inflammation-based underlying mechanisms. They suggest that promoting an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern may contribute to cancer prevention."

Source:
J Nutr 2016;146:78591.

More:
Every 10 g carrot reduces chance of prostate cancer by 5 percent 08.11.2014
Every cup of coffee you drink diminishes your chances of prostate cancer (a little) 13.02.2014
Quercetin boosts inhibitory effect of green tea for prostate cancer 27.01.2014

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Cancer Prevention
Prostate Cancer